Category: Parents

Father Reading to Child

3 Tips to Create Effective Storytime with Your Child

Reading with your children is essential to creating a variety of literacy skills at an early age. Research has shown the importance of exposing children to literacy by reading. However, sometimes it might be difficult to keep them engaged. Here are 3 tips to create effective and engaging Storytime with your child.

  1. Shared book reading – This is when children are engaged with text and illustrations while reading. Parents should expose the child to vocabulary, ask questions about the illustrations, ask comprehension questions like who, what, when, where, and why, and make inference/prediction questions. Keep your child engaged in what they are reading and what the child thinks is going to happen next with images or context clues in the story. You can also connect books to personal life by finding a book that a child may connect to i.e. if your child is starting school you can find a book about the first day of school.  
  2. Finding the right book – Choosing the right book and finding books that will keep your child engaged is crucial. Depending on your child’s age, you want to look for books with appealing content and illustrations. If your child is into space, find books about space! For younger children, it is important to find books with predictable repetitive context i.e. Dr. Seuss. This gives the child the opportunity to create reading fluency and exposure to words that they may read independently during Storytime.
  3. How to read books – When you are reading with your child it is important to read with enthusiasm. Create eye contact, add dramatic flair or even silly voices to keep the engagement while reading. You can also provide opportunities for your child to join in by reading along with you, taking turns reading or repeating what you just read.

Creating effective Storytime with your child can give them the skills that they need to succeed. Keeping your child engaged and interested in what they are reading makes reading fun. Pick up a good book and read with your child today!

Speech Teletherapy Dallas

Teletherapy Speech-Language Services

Our team of Speech-Language Pathologists in Dallas Texas are here to provide Speech therapy from the comfort of your own home. We aim to inspire and empower our students as we Embrace the Amazing in Every Child from online via your computer, tablet, or phone. Speech Language Therapy online has been shown to be an effective service delivery model with teletherapy working well for most students.

How do telehealth services work? After scheduling services with our front office, you will be given a link to attend a HIPAA protected therapy session. The online system that we use contains many Apps, visual boards and therapeutic games to keep students engaged as they practice their speech sounds, make up sentences about an interactive scene, assemble sentences, and address many other communication and literacy skills. Individual stories and other materials are easily uploaded on the screen for more specific targeting of the child’s goals.

Children as young as Pre-School 3- and 4- have shown success with Online Speech Therapy with the help of a parent – if your child has trouble attending to structured tasks, we may request that a parent or adult attend and help the child stay engaged during their sessions. Not only will this improve your child’s performance but will also help you learn ways in which to best help your child in their communication goals. Many students thrive on computer interaction, but LIVE computer interaction is even better, and it’s customized to meet their needs.

The intake process for teletherapy services is the same; we start with either a Screening or comprehensive Speech-Language Evaluation. Our clinic offers free Screenings where you and your child can meet with an SLP for a “mini-test”. After completing the full Speech-Language Evaluation the SLP writes a report with individual goals for therapy. The evaluation may take place online or in our clinic.

Due to the current health crisis, many insurance companies have made it easier for providers to serve clients remotely. We accept insurance and directly bill Blue Cross Blue Shield, United Healthcare, and TriCare, and the Medicaid plans Parkland, Amerigroup, Children’s, and TMHP. We also offer private pay services on a sliding scale basis and will keep a credit card on file to bill for each session or any copays at the time of service. Please contact us directly to discuss private pay services or additional payment options.

Our team also offers specialized reading tutoring online, which is available nationwide to boost reading decoding, reading comprehension and written composition skills. Our services are tailored to the individual specific needs for a range of students, from beginning readers, Elementary, Junior High and through High School.

Time for a pep talk

We have spirit, Yes we do!! We have spirit, how ‘bout you?

By Rachel Betzen, M.S., CCC/SLP
Reflection written for weekly staff meeting and “rounds” Based on Kid President’s “Pep Talk”

It’s time for a pep talk.  Sometimes we all need a little motivation.  Sometimes we all need to rally our cheerleaders, huddle up with our team, make a game plan, lay out our moves, and just go for it.  Fall brings lots of changes and is a time of transition.  This change in seasons with the beautiful falling leaves brings other changes and challenges that happen internally.

Kids that struggle in school are finding out that it’s not getting any easier, and many of them feel like they are getting further behind.  Kids that struggle socially have their potential peers getting busier with sports, clubs, homework, and other demands on their time.  Parents that struggle to support these kids are becoming more stressed out about unfinished homework, challenging school projects, and worries over whether their child will be able to make it this year.  Fall can be a stressful time for kids that struggle.

In times of great need, there will be those who step up to the challenge, to see what they are really made of and really capable of.  We can’t expect these to be our children, not yet.  However, I believe that it is tremendously powerful for our kids to understand that they have the potential to become that kind of person.  They have the potential to become an inspiration for other kids who have the same challenges.  They won’t see it yet, and they may not even believe us, but we have to help them step back and look at the big picture.  They have the potential to be the one who will someday give this pep talk to others. They can be a hero, a leader, a friend.

In order for our kids to achieve this, they have to work through their challenges.  Kids with speech-language delays and learning differences have more than their fair share of challenges, that is for sure.  The increasing demands and expectations of schoolwork can easily overwhelm them, and they can get stuck in this feeling of overwhelm.  This is when they need a pep talk.  This is when they need to rally their cheerleaders and gather their team support. This is when they need to realize that this isn’t about a game or a competition, we really are all in this together, or at least we should be.  We can be amazing cheerleaders and inspire our children and their parents to be on the same team and rally for the same goal.  We all need a pep talk sometimes.  The most powerful pep talks of all, are the ones that inspire our kids to become an inspiration themselves.

Go team Go!!!

The Do’s and Don’ts of Engaging the Rabbit Trail

By Rachel Betzen, M.S., CCC/SLP

At one time or another the children that we work with will inevitably veer off course from the direct activity they are doing, to ask a related (or unrelated) question, or to tell us about something they are reminded of.  I personally get a little excited when this happens, though I realize that this is probably not the initial reaction of most clinicians.  There are some “rabbit trails” that we can use to further engage the student, and reignite their love of learning.  Other kinds of “rabbit trails” disengage the child from therapy tasks, and it is more effective to redirect them back to their work.

Determining which kind of rabbit trail the child is leading us down will help determine whether we go along for the ride- vs. redirecting.  If the child is asking a relevant or related question, it’s ok to stop and talk about that.  I like being near a computer, so I can search for images related to the topic.  Sometimes we need to give more background info and the computer is a good tool to use.  We have two laptops that are available, and taking them into the therapy office to your PC is ok too.

Sometimes with tangentially related rabbit trails, I take advantage of them as a “compare and contrast” learning opportunity.  If the child can explain how the topic is related and how it differs from the information we are using with them, that deepens their understanding.  If this is too distracting or taking too much time, it’s also ok to tell the child how their question is similar and different to their topic, and then re-direct back to their work.

Fist Bump for a Job well done in Speech Therapy
Fist Bump for a Job well done in Speech Therapy

For redirections, I often tell kids to put their distraction “in the back of their attention”, and they respond “put this in the front”.  A quick reminder to “put it in the back” is sometimes all they need to re-focus.  One of our highly distracted students is beginning to remind himself “ok, I’ll put that in the back and my work in the front”!

The Socratic learning process encourages students to discover the right answer or a deeper understanding through us asking the right questions.  Using this method is bound to lead us through multiple rabbit trails.  When a student is doing a “stinking thinking rabbit trail” we need to stop whatever we are doing and redirect them back to the positive.  The socratic method is a powerful tool as students learn to see their “mistakes” as a way to focus more on where they need additional learning.  This helps us lessen their emotional response to “failure” and empowers them to become more independent learners.

 

Father Reading to Child

3 Tips to Create Effective Storytime with Your Child

Reading with your children is essential to creating a variety of literacy skills at an early age. Research has shown the …

Speech Teletherapy Dallas

Teletherapy Speech-Language Services

Our team of Speech-Language Pathologists in Dallas Texas are here to provide Speech therapy from the comfort of your own …

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